Tag Archive for: technique

U.S. Army Physical Readiness Division: Mission success at Fort Polk, LA while teaching Soldiers from the Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital BJACH and Delta Troop 1-509th the Pose Method of Running and the Army Combat Fitness Test. These Leaders have learned to run better, faster, injury free; and are now Level 2 ACFT Certified. They’re tasked with the responsibility of training their units to the standard.

A big shout out goes to the 519th Military Police Battalion for allowing USAPFS MFT / ACFT Instructors to utilize their equipment and mini-SPRC for our training. Thank You!

U.S. Army Center for Initial Military Training U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

THE HISTORY

Running has always been part of military training. It is an essential activity that is part of virtually everything else soldiers must do on regular basis. And it's been known for years, that as an activity, running is also the most dangerous athletic movement solely due to the amount of injuries that soldiers sustain. More than 2 out of 3 injured soldiers face injuries from running. However, running itself is not the issue.

THE PROBLEM

Soldiers are trained and taught how to do virtually every task, however, running, the activity directly responsible for an overwhelming majority of all military related musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries, is not taught as a skill.

THE SOLUTION

Health and Holistic Fitness, or H2F is a big initiative by the Army to revamp training protocols. One of the major updates in the new doctrine is the addition of Running Skill (Pose Method) in FM 7-22 (Chapter 7).

Running Skill training is now available on demand, forcewide,  through the Army IgnitED program. Individual Soldiers can watch Pose Method running skill training videos online, and take an exam to become a certified instructor (technical certification, promotion points).

Questions? Contact us for assistance.

[ READ MORE ]

Lt. Col. Mae Miranda, chief of physical therapy at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center and the Army’s physical therapy consultant for the region, invited MAJ Blake, the inspector general for U.S. Army Medical Command in San Antonio, to hold a Pose Method workshop for about 45 Army and Air Force physical therapists, physical therapist assistants and technicians, and fitness trainers from around Europe.

 

Mechanical efficiency leads to aerobic efficiency, which leads then to an overall (better) efficiency because I could recover faster and I could train more.

 

The goal of learning the Pose Method is for military physical therapists and fitness trainers to be able to help personnel reduce injury and increase speed when it comes to running. Some fitness experts in the Army swear by it, which partly explains why the technique is gaining a foothold in military circles. Such claims are appealing to the military, where injuries from running and fitness test failures from slow run times are costly and contribute to decreased readiness. About 60 to 66 percent of soldiers who report to sick call — the Army’s term for needing medical attention — have muscular-skeletal related injuries.

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THE HISTORY

Running has always been part of military training. It is an essential activity that is part of virtually everything else soldiers must do on regular basis. And it's been known for years, that as an activity, running is also the most dangerous athletic movement solely due to the amount of injuries that soldiers sustain. More than 2 out of 3 injured soldiers face injuries from running. However, running itself is not the issue.

THE PROBLEM

Soldiers are trained and taught how to do virtually every task, however, running, the activity directly responsible for an overwhelming majority of all military related musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries, is not taught as a skill.

THE SOLUTION

Health and Holistic Fitness, or H2F is a big initiative by the Army to revamp training protocols. One of the major updates in the new doctrine is the addition of Running Skill (Pose Method) in FM 7-22 (Chapter 7).

Running Skill training is now available on demand, forcewide,  through the Army IgnitED program. Individual Soldiers can watch Pose Method running skill training videos online, and take an exam to become a certified instructor (technical certification, promotion points).

Questions? Contact us for assistance.

[ READ MORE ]

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii – For many service members of various services, running is an integral part of their physical training regimen. Many have gotten used to someone telling them to push harder, go faster, use certain muscles or lengthen their stride. Few are told, quite simply, to use gravity to their advantage. Joint Service Members, fireman, Federal Bureau I… and SWAT members from across Oahu were introduced to that very concept as part of an armed services “Pose” Running Seminar given by Dr. Nicholas Romanov and hosted by Crossfit Oahu in Honolulu Oct. 15.

Romanov, who conceptualized and began to implement Pose Running, visited Oahu for a three day running seminar and certification where he taught Soldiers and civilians how to run and even teach the Pose Method. Romanov has been coined as one of, if not the, most innovative thinker on running in our time. He is the author of Dr. Romanov’s Pose Method of Running.

Romanov discovered the concept of Pose Running in 1977, and has worked ever since to spread his wealth of knowledge to old and new runners alike, training world champions and record breakers for years.

Romanov likens his method to that used by the ancient Greeks, who brought a philosophical approach to running.

“The Greeks always viewed nature as a whole,” said Romanov. “Our definitions of structures and systems are derived from the Greeks. They understood how to effectively integrate all they did into the natural scheme of life’s science.”

Gravity is the most powerful force on earth. For Romanov, it is only natural to use it to an advantage as a runner. He states that once we have learned to integrate our running to the natural science of life, then our body will reward us.

For many Soldiers, running has become unpleasant as over the years they have experienced over-fatigue and recurring injuries. With Pose, Romanov hopes to help break that chain.

“I don’t really understand why anyone would run any other way, ” said Staff Sgt. Aaron Cheateaux, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 8th Military Police Brigade. “The injury rates (for Soldiers) from overuse alone are substantial. We could prevent the majority of them just by teaching Soldiers to run with style.”

According to Romanov, many of these ailments begin as they overextend their muscles and strive at unnatural angles to propel themselves over the earth. What is proposed by Romanov is that they adopt a proper “pose” for running that takes undue tension from the joints and muscles. This pose consists of a bent knee stance with back and head aligned and feet positioned beneath the body so as to utilize one’s natural center of gravity. Once this pose is attained, then the runner simply “falls” forward, using gravity, then “pulls” the foot up under their center of gravity again to resume the original pose.

For many Soldiers, they have worked very hard for years to reach their running goals, fighting through difficulty and muscle pain to become elite.

“I have made it through some of the toughest Army training to include Ranger School,” said Maj. Iven Sugai, USARPAC G-3 Training Division. “But I did so by ‘muscling’ my way through. In other words, keep running frequently and hard until I saw results. I hope that learning Pose running will teach me about running what learning proper swimming technique did for my lap swimming. Once I learned proper form I spent the same, if not less, energy that I used before but was able to swim farther and faster.”

Many senior military personnel who attended the seminar were excited to learn the new method for themselves and for their subordinates.

“I will definitely look to implement many of Dr. Romanov’s skill development drills and flexibility training into our weekly Physical Training sessions,” said Lt. Navy Dude, Base Facility Engineer for Coast Guard Base Support Unit Honolulu. “Although running is not everyone’s favorite cardio building exercise, I believe staying injury-free by allowing your body to work more ‘skillfully’ is something that EVERYONE should be interested in.”

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THE HISTORY

Running has always been part of military training. It is an essential activity that is part of virtually everything else soldiers must do on regular basis. And it's been known for years, that as an activity, running is also the most dangerous athletic movement solely due to the amount of injuries that soldiers sustain. More than 2 out of 3 injured soldiers face injuries from running. However, running itself is not the issue.

THE PROBLEM

Soldiers are trained and taught how to do virtually every task, however, running, the activity directly responsible for an overwhelming majority of all military related musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries, is not taught as a skill.

THE SOLUTION

Health and Holistic Fitness, or H2F is a big initiative by the Army to revamp training protocols. One of the major updates in the new doctrine is the addition of Running Skill (Pose Method) in FM 7-22 (Chapter 7).

Running Skill training is now available on demand, forcewide,  through the Army IgnitED program. Individual Soldiers can watch Pose Method running skill training videos online, and take an exam to become a certified instructor (technical certification, promotion points).

Questions? Contact us for assistance.

[ READ MORE ]

“Contrary to what some people believe, running shouldn’t be painful,” said Capt. Charles Blake, the 434th Field Artillery Brigade surgeon. “If it is, you’re doing something wrong.”

Blake, who is also a physical therapist, is responsible for the physical training and rehabilitation plans for Soldiers who are injured in Basic Combat Training. He said most of the injuries he treats are the result of improper running.

While he was trying to develop a physical fitness plan that would work for both the Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Program and the Fitness Training Platoon, he remembered an article he read nine years ago.

Blake revisited the article about a new running style developed by Dr. Nicholas Romanov, a sports scientist and former Olympic running coach. The technique is called Pose Running, and Blake began to study the biomechanics of Romanov’s running style.

“It was beautiful, and it made perfect sense,” Blake said.

He explained that unlike other sports, technique has not been taught as a running skill. Different people run different ways, but it was never linked to performance until Romanov started conducting his research on the biomechanics of human movement.

Blake worked with people throughout the Fort Sill and found that the most cost-effective way to train leaders on the pose technique was to bring Romanov to Fort Sill. Romanov has conducted five-day Pose Running clinics twice at Fort Sill, and Blake said about 45 drill sergeants, cadre and fires battery personnel are now certified Pose Running coaches. Fort Sill now has the highest concentration of certified Pose Running coaches in the United States.

According to Pose Tech, the company Romanov formed to educate athletes on the Pose Method, “The Running Pose is a whole-body pose (that) vertically aligns the shoulders, hips and ankles with the support leg, while standing on the ball of the foot. This creates an S-like shape of the body. The runner then changes the pose from one leg to the other by falling forward and allowing gravity to do the work. The support foot is pulled from the ground to allow the body to fall forward, while the other foot drops down freely in a change of support. This creates forward movement with the least energy use and the least effort. The end result is faster race times, freer running and (reduced) injuries.”

Staff Sgt. John Carroll, a drill sergeant with the Fitness Training Battery and a Pose Running coach, said Romanov based the whole theory on using gravity to propel your body through natural motion.

“You have the initial pose, which is the natural body position,” Carroll explained. “Every runner, no matter what style they run in, they will hit that pose at some point in their stride. The goal is to return to pose as quickly as possible. Most people who don’t run a lot, they take a long time to return to pose. The second part of the pose is the fall. Basically you are leaned forward and you use gravity to start to propel yourself forward. The final part is the pull. All you’re doing is pulling your foot off the ground.”

Blake said the injury implications are unlimited.

“Running well is about technique; it’s a skilled sport,” Blake explained. “There is a clear distinction between good runners and bad runners, and it’s all about technique.”

[ Click here to read full article ]

 

THE HISTORY

Running has always been part of military training. It is an essential activity that is part of virtually everything else soldiers must do on regular basis. And it's been known for years, that as an activity, running is also the most dangerous athletic movement solely due to the amount of injuries that soldiers sustain. More than 2 out of 3 injured soldiers face injuries from running. However, running itself is not the issue.

THE PROBLEM

Soldiers are trained and taught how to do virtually every task, however, running, the activity directly responsible for an overwhelming majority of all military related musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries, is not taught as a skill.

THE SOLUTION

Health and Holistic Fitness, or H2F is a big initiative by the Army to revamp training protocols. One of the major updates in the new doctrine is the addition of Running Skill (Pose Method) in FM 7-22 (Chapter 7).

Running Skill training is now available on demand, forcewide,  through the Army IgnitED program. Individual Soldiers can watch Pose Method running skill training videos online, and take an exam to become a certified instructor (technical certification, promotion points).

Questions? Contact us for assistance.

[ READ MORE ]